Thursday, Oct 19th
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Clipartopolis University
Creating a Calendar using Embird Editor

Before starting this lesson please install the MonotypeSort Font into your windows font folder.
Click here to download the font & 2 PES files

Open Embird Editor.

Go to Insert – Font Engine Text.

I am using the Arial Text.



Go to the bottom right hand corner of the menu and select the calender icon.



From the menu that opens make the following selections.



We are making a Monthly calender, starting in January 2006. The week will start on a Sunday and the headings S,M,T,W,T,F,S will be the subheadings.

Click OK when you have these settings.

You need to wait whilst Embird compiles the calender for you. The end result will look like this in 3D View:



Now we have left most things as default so when you look at the Object order menu you will see lots of colour changes.



You can leave it like this but I prefer to remove the outlines around the text and numbers. Save this sample for future reference.

Now open a new window and select Insert – Font Engine Text now before we select the Calender Icon go to the properties menu and select the No Outline box.



Now select the Calender icon and the same selections and click OK.

Wait for it to compile and then you will have a calender like this one for January 2006.


You will also have less thread colour changes showing on the Objects menu.



Remember you can change the colours to suit your calender. SAVE THIS CALENDAR.

Repeat the same process for each month of your calender.

If you want you can also make a Years Calender in the one go, but you would need a large hoop to machine it out in the one hooping. When you compile the Years Calender you need to Group them into one design if you are going to use a Large hoop. Until you do this each month is separate and you can save each month by using the Save Selected As choice when saving. Don't forget to centre the month you want to save. As you can see by the following image it is a large calender (the green square is the 4in x 4in hoop.



This also takes Embird a while to compile the Calender so be patient.

For this exercise we are just going to use 1 month and merge some small designs in the corner.

Open a new window.

Go to Insert – Font Engine Text and select the MonotypeSort Font from the True Type font menu.



Select the flower font


Double click on it to send it to the text line.



Select the Properties Menu and select the following:



Click OK and change the colour of the flower to pink.

Now select Insert and select the circle font.



Change the size to 5mm in the properties menu. Click OK

Change the colour to orange and drag it up the order using your left mouse button on the object menu so that it stitches first. With both parts selected join them.





You now have a small flower.



Save your flower.

Open the Calender we saved (without outline).

Now merge (File – Merge) your flower. Copy (Control+C) and Paste (Control +V) another flower and place them in the corner of your calender.


Don't forget to join the flowers and use the Sort button.



This cuts down on colour changes.

I hope this lesson gives you ideas on using the Calender facility in Embird.

 

Born in England, I developed a love for sewing at a very early age and recall using her mothers old Singer handle machine to make clothes for myself.

Arriving in Sydney Australia at the age of 16, I was keen to start work so I could save part of my wages to purchase a sewing machine. “I was absolutely thrilled with my Bernina 740 machine and I still make good use of it today”.

I was introduced to the world of computerised machine embroidery by a friend 10 years ago, which opened up a whole new and exciting pathway to explore. Although persuading my husband Greg that I needed an embroidery machine, software and computer was a different kind of challenge. After a shopping expedition a new computer, PE100 Embroidery machine and PE Design Version 1 were duly purchased.

Proceeding to teach myself I discovered that screen capturing the computer screen enabled me to learn from my mistake. It also allowed me to pass on the knowledge I gained to other people needing help and so the Ayeone Website was formed. www.ayeone.com

Running two websites, allows people access to information and helpful advice. I am a busy digitiser creating my own embroidery design collections as well as useful tutorials which are readily available on CD and download from my website.

10 years on I still find Machine Embroidery a great hobby and love catching up with people from all over the world.



Vanessa Page
Email: ayeone@coomerawaters.net.au

Ayeone World

http://www.ayeone.com

If you want to learn more about the great world of digitizing you can find many fantastic tutorials at Vanessa's websites.

You can go to www.ayeone.com or visit her newest creation www.ayeoneclasses.com

 

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